Download Talking Books: Readings in Hellenistic and Roman Books of by G. O. Hutchinson PDF

By G. O. Hutchinson

Expanding value is being hooked up to how Greek and Latin books of poems have been prepared, yet such learn has frequently been performed with little realization to the actual fragments of exact historic poetry-books. during this huge examine Gregory Hutchinson investigates the layout of Greek and Latin books of poems within the mild of papyri, together with contemporary discoveries. a chain of discussions of significant poems and collections from significant classes of Greek and Latin literature is framed through a considerable and illustrated survey of poetry-books and studying, and by means of a extra theoretical dialogue of constructions regarding books. the most poets mentioned are Callimachus, Apollonius, Posidippus, Catullus, Horace, and Ovid; a bankruptcy on Latin didactic contains Lucretius, Virgil, Ovid, and Manilius.

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35 On closure to Propertius’ love-elegy in and after Book 3, cf. Hutchinson (2006b), 7–10. Doing Things with Books 29 coexistence retrospectively. He wishes his consular speeches to be seen and denoted as a body (#HìÆ), like Demosthenes’ Philippics, Att. 36 Within planned series, the individual books are often approached as distinct entities. Balbus took one book of the De Finibus, the last, to transcribe (Att. 1). The speaker at Tusc. 32 tells Cicero legi tuum nuper quartum de Wnibus (he is aware of the pairing with the third book).

65–86 (distractions in city); Cic. Fam. 2, Cat. 68a. 33–6 (books in Rome). Doing Things with Books 37 Palatine was large enough for oYcial meetings (P. Oxy. 29–40; cf. Suet. Aug. 51 Greek and Latin books were often, perhaps usually, kept distinct in libraries. The Palatine library and the Porticus Octaviae stored Greek books separately from Latin (cf. P. Oxy. ); at Att. 7 the presumption seems to be that the late Ser. Claudius’ collection had distinct Greek and Latin parts, both desirable. Such separation in place heightens for the consciousness of readers the diVerence that we saw in Greek and Latin papyri themselves.

123; even at Hor. Epist. 53–4 note paene recens. The poet Alexander of Ephesus (SH 19–39) may be a Greek contemporary; but Cicero is reading him with a purpose (Att. 7). 3 cf. Hutchinson (2001b), 153–4. 50 Cf. Hor. Sat. 60–2, Epist. 65–86 (distractions in city); Cic. Fam. 2, Cat. 68a. 33–6 (books in Rome). Doing Things with Books 37 Palatine was large enough for oYcial meetings (P. Oxy. 29–40; cf. Suet. Aug. 51 Greek and Latin books were often, perhaps usually, kept distinct in libraries. The Palatine library and the Porticus Octaviae stored Greek books separately from Latin (cf.

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